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Biography
Biography

Editor-in-Chief of OBM Hepatology and Gastroenterology

Osamu Yokosuka is an Emeritus Professor of Chiba University, Japan. He graduated from Chiba University School of Medicine in 1975 then worked as a trainee under Professor K. Okuda in Chiba University Hospital till 1978. Dr. Yokosuka was a research fellow worked under Professor S. Scherlock and Professor B. H. Billing in Royal Free Hospital, London, UK from 1978 to 1980; under Professor M. Omata in Chiba University from 1980 to 1985; and under Dr. J Summers in Fox Chase Cancer Center, PA, USA in 1984. In 1985, he received a Degree of Doctor of Medical Science, and served as an Assistant Professor in Chiba University till 1994, then as Lecturer in Medicine till 2006 when he was appointed as Director and Professor of Medicine. From 2013 to 2015, he served as the Dean of Chiba University School of Medicine.

Dr. Yokosuka was the Secretary General of APASL (2008-2014). In 2016, he was elected as the President of APASL Tokyo, the President of 52nd Annual Meeting of Japan Society of Hepatology, and the President of Funabashi Central Hospital. Dr. Yokosuka’s research mainly focuses on Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma. So far, he has published more than 700 original papers.

Biography

The Associate Editor of OBM Hepatology and Gastroenterology

Tatsuo Kanda received a medical degree in 1991 at Niigata University School of Medicine, Japan, and his PhD in 1999 at Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. He had post-doctor training for 3 years under Prof. Ratna Ray and Prof. Ranjit Ray at Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA. In Dec. 2008, Tatsuo Kanda became a Tenure-track Associate Professor at Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. In Feb. 2013, Tatsuo Kanda was nominated a permanent Associate Professor at Department of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. In 2017, Tatsuo Kanda became an Associate Professor, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine. For ~25 years, he has focused his scientific interests on the topics related to liver diseases including acute liver failure, viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver diseases, and worked with Prof. Osamu Yokosuka. Tatsuo Kanda is also an expert for hepatitis A virus (HAV), HBV and HCV, and translation and replication of these viruses, and hepatocarcinogenesis. With his expertise in antiviral therapies and hepatitis virus research, Tatsuo Kanda also sees a lot of patients in clinical daily practice. Tatsuo Kanda has published more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed Journal.

Special Issue

Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Breast Cancer

Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019 (Open)               Submit Now

Guest Editor

Dr. Reginald Halaby
Department of Biology, Montclair State University Normal Avenue, Montclair, NJ USA
E-Mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.montclair.edu/profilepages/view_profile.php?username=halabyr
Research Interests: Cancer biology; apoptosis; lysosomal-mediated cell death; triptolide; breast cancer

About This Topic

Breast cancer is a global affliction killing men, women, transgendered, teens through the elderly, and people from every racial and ethnic background. Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women globally and causes the greatest amount of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Clearly, novel approaches and treatments are warranted to combat this malignancy.
Complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) are thought to have a range of benefits for people with breast cancer. They can give patients comfort and help them feel more relaxed when coming to terms with the physical and emotional effects of breast cancer and its treatment. Some people believe they help with the side effects of breast cancer and treatment.
CAT is becoming increasingly popular among cancer patients, in particular those with breast cancer. It represents one of the fastest growing treatment modalities in the United States. Therefore, knowledge of CAT is becoming necessary. CAT encompasses a wide range of modalities. Potential topics for consideration in this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following: spiritual practice, relaxation, traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, hypnosis, vitamins and nutritional supplements, herbs, Cannabinoids, diet, photodynamic immunotherapy, homeopathic remedies, and medical imaging.
We sincerely invite investigators to contribute original research and review articles for this special issue, and we hope it will advance the research of breast cancer.