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Biography
Biography

Editor-in-Chief of OBM Hepatology and Gastroenterology

Osamu Yokosuka is an Emeritus Professor of Chiba University, Japan. He graduated from Chiba University School of Medicine in 1975 then worked as a trainee under Professor K. Okuda in Chiba University Hospital till 1978. Dr. Yokosuka was a research fellow worked under Professor S. Scherlock and Professor B. H. Billing in Royal Free Hospital, London, UK from 1978 to 1980; under Professor M. Omata in Chiba University from 1980 to 1985; and under Dr. J Summers in Fox Chase Cancer Center, PA, USA in 1984. In 1985, he received a Degree of Doctor of Medical Science, and served as an Assistant Professor in Chiba University till 1994, then as Lecturer in Medicine till 2006 when he was appointed as Director and Professor of Medicine. From 2013 to 2015, he served as the Dean of Chiba University School of Medicine.

Dr. Yokosuka was the Secretary General of APASL (2008-2014). In 2016, he was elected as the President of APASL Tokyo, the President of 52nd Annual Meeting of Japan Society of Hepatology, and the President of Funabashi Central Hospital. Dr. Yokosuka’s research mainly focuses on Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma. So far, he has published more than 700 original papers.

Biography

The Associate Editor of OBM Hepatology and Gastroenterology

Tatsuo Kanda received a medical degree in 1991 at Niigata University School of Medicine, Japan, and his PhD in 1999 at Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. He had post-doctor training for 3 years under Prof. Ratna Ray and Prof. Ranjit Ray at Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA. In Dec. 2008, Tatsuo Kanda became a Tenure-track Associate Professor at Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. In Feb. 2013, Tatsuo Kanda was nominated a permanent Associate Professor at Department of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. In 2017, Tatsuo Kanda became an Associate Professor, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine. For ~25 years, he has focused his scientific interests on the topics related to liver diseases including acute liver failure, viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver diseases, and worked with Prof. Osamu Yokosuka. Tatsuo Kanda is also an expert for hepatitis A virus (HAV), HBV and HCV, and translation and replication of these viruses, and hepatocarcinogenesis. With his expertise in antiviral therapies and hepatitis virus research, Tatsuo Kanda also sees a lot of patients in clinical daily practice. Tatsuo Kanda has published more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed Journal.

Special Issue

Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia

Submission Deadline: July 30, 2019 (Open)                Submit Now

Guest Editor

Ladislav Volicer, MD, PhD
Courtesy Full Professor, School of Aging Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 33620, USA
External Professor, 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://intra.cbcs.usf.edu/persontracker/common/file/cv-280.pdf
Research Interests: Dementia; Alzheimer's disease; Palliative care; Medical ethics; Behavioral symptoms of dementia

About This Topic

Behavioral symptoms in persons with progressive degenerative dementias are often more disabling and more difficult to manage than cognitive impairments. Therefore, there is a need for more information about this topic and the planned special issue will provide it. It is important to differentiate between two main syndromes: agitation and rejection of care. Agitation often happens when the person with dementia is solitary and not interacting with other people. Rejection of care happens during care activities when the person with dementia does not recognize the intent of the care provider and the need for care. If the care provider insists on providing care, the person with dementia defends himself/herself from unwanted attention and may become combative. The person may then be labeled as assaultive or aggressive, while he/she perceives the care provider as an aggressor. The distinction between agitation and rejection of care/aggression is important because different non-pharmacological strategies are needed for managing these behavioral symptoms. Agitation is often caused by boredom and can be prevented by provision of meaningful activities. Aggression is best managed by improved communication and by modification of care strategies. There is disagreement among the experts if aggression should be considered part of agitation. I am sure that the special issue will provide different points of view that will address this controversy.

Publication

Editorial

Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia

Ladislav Volicer
Received: November 04, 2018; Published: November 08, 2018; doi:10.21926/obm.geriatr.1804019